© Videonale e.V.

The development of the VideonaleOnlineArchive was supported by

Contact us

Videonale e.V. Phone +49 (0)228 69 28 18
im Kunstmuseum Bonn info@videonale.org
Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 2  
53113 Bonn  

Ditte Ejlerskov [Videonale.10]

* 1982 in Frederikshavn DEN, lives in Malmö SWE
Studied at Konsthögskolan Malmö SWE, at Cooper Union School of Art, New York USA, at Det Fynske Kunstakademi, Odense DEN and at Byhøjskolen, Århus DEN

 

Exhibitions [selection]:

 

2012 The Collector, Uppsala Konstmuseum, Uppsala SWE
         In Search of Eden (mit Johan Furåker), Centre of Contemporary Art, Andratx ESP

2011 Full Arch, Crystal Contemporary, Stockholm SWE [S]
         My African Letters, Larm Gallery, Kopenhagen DEN [S]

2010 A tale of plans, told by misgivings, Elastic Gallery, Malmö SWE [S]
         Claude Rutault - L’exposition continue (écho), CNEAI, Chatou FRA

2009 Obsessive Education, Skissernas museum, Lund SWE [S]
         The Black Diamond, Det Kongelige Bibliotek, Kopenhagen DEN [S]

2008 Galleri Ping Pong, Malmö SWE [S]
         Crystal, Stockholm SWE [S]

2007 Galleri Pictura, Lund SWE [S]
         Kiss my Rad Habits, Cooper Union, New York USA

 

www.ditteejlerskov.com 

 

Ditte Ejlerskov [Videonale.10] x

The Game of Art, 2003, 2:10 min., colour, sound [Videonale.10]

„This is the Game of Art. Right now, in front of this monitor, you are a player yourself. Hope you are familiar with the rules, because there is now one to help you. Do you want to enter the next level? Well, we all do!“ In a certain sense, Ejlerskov is not at the starting point of The Game of Art but has finished it: she has reached the next level, the next exhibition, the next successful participation in a competition. The artist adapts in a witty manner the structure and style of computer games in order to deliver an ironic commentary about the art world. Ejlerskov inverts the increasingly perfect, digital imitation of real spaces, surfaces and movements. She now copies the virtual world and embodies the avatar herself. Equally, her playing field is not virtual but real: it is her studio. On the way to it, paint, artist?s outfit and courage must be gathered. The rules of the game and the criteria for attaining points remain indeed as mysterious as was announced at the beginning. Thus The Game of Art comments humorously on the sometimes incomprehensible mechanisms of the art world and the blurred principles in assigning artistic merits. And ... the artist wins.
Dorothée Brill

Ditte Ejlerskov